The RAINDROP Acronym

Course Introduction

RAIN is a widely used approach to develop insight and nourish wisdom. Here, Michele explains the qualities that make up RAIN. We will also explore the habits that RAIN replaces using the DROP acronym.

The RAINDROP Acronym

Recognition

What is really happening? 

Remember to be here.

Re-collect the attention.

Relax and receive the experience.

Acceptance

Can we accept the fact that it is happening?

Acceptance does not mean condoning, it means not denying the truth of what is happening.

Interest

Can we investigate with genuine interest?

What are the subtler qualities of the experience?

Pure exploration has no agenda to decrease pain or increase pleasure. 

Interest recognizes that every experience is worthy of our attention.

Nonidentification

Is it pain in "my" back or is it "pressure and tightness?"

Am "I" angry or has anger simply arisen because of causes and conditions?

Do I believe this experience is “me” or “mine,” and that I can control it?

If we look closely, the sense of "me" or "mine" is woven into our experience.

Distraction 

The opposite of recognition.

Are you really aware of what is happening, or caught in fantasy, ideas, or projections about what is happening? This is delusion. 

You may notice the feeling of being spaced out, pretending, or being dismissive.

Resistance

The opposite of acceptance.

Our minds have powerful tools of resisting reality: craving, aversion, sloth and torpor, restlessness and worry, and doubt.

These hindrances have many flavors, from fear to sleepiness to self-hatred.

Obliviousness

The opposite of interest.

Do you care about what is happening?

You may notice boredom, apathy, indifference, or disinterest. 

Often we are caught in the trap of pleasure and pain, unable to find genuine interest in our experience.

Personification

The opposite of nonidentification.

This is when we feel so strongly identified with a sense of "me," "mine," or "my self." "I’m angry." "I’m bored." 

We don't have to get rid of this feeling but we need to recognize that identification is happening. 

We also get caught in the trap of conceit: comparing ourselves as better than, worse than, or equal to others.